You are what you spec.

To borrow (and rephrase) a standard question from a famous interviewer, if you were a typeface, which typeface would you be? AcrobatAnt challenged its art directors to set their own names in a typeface that reflects who they are and their point of view, then let other office colleagues try to match the art director with the typeface. Here are our results, a mix of surprising and expected. What typeface are you?

AA-140507_Designer_DannyAA-140507_Designer_DellAA-140507_Designer_Chance

AA-140507_Designer_CaylaAA-140507_Designer_BryanAA-140507_Designer_JinniAA-140507_Designer_Will

 

Danny Sadler
Franklin Gothic Condensed

AcrobatAnt’s creative director chose this traditional font because he can subtly kern certain characters to make them flow together better. He likes its tall X height (the torso of the letters, the middle ground above the descenders and below the ascenders). Casual. Readable. Just a good, classic face. A foundation face that’s powerful and carries its weight. Good for invitations, too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dell Chambers
Da Streets

He’s an illustrator and painter, so you can guess what kind of typeface Dell would choose: a brush font. There’s nothing demure about this one. Edgy. Fun. Aggressive. With some “pow” to it. He says it fits his personality. For the record, he didn’t fool anyone in the office. Dell tied with one other art director for getting the most correct votes matching him with his typeface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chance Walentiny
Sloop

Chances likes plenty of things about this classically elegant script typeface. See the way the H thins out? Chance especially likes how each character has little details and nuances that make a big difference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cayla Spears
Eyes Wide Open

Cayla must’ve made her typeface choice while looking in a mirror. She picked one that’s girly, but just sort of girly, not too girly. Not too elegant, either. Hers is a down-to-earth option that’s easy enough and thick enough to kern. Most of all, she picked it because it looks like real handwriting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bryan Cooper
Flemish Script

You think you know an art director, but no one in the office matched Bryan to the font he picked. To him, though, it made perfect sense. His fine art often focuses on the historical, Victorian and ornate. He loves antiques and collects old photography. And with this particular typeface, the thick and thin elements aren’t too exaggerated, making it a nice, easy script to read. Great for monogramming, too, as a fellow art director pointed out.

 

 

 


 

 

 

Jinni Giltner
Mohave

Jinni goes for the tall, dramatic and condensed type. Her choice is available in regular and bold. Caps only, no lower case, so her headlines are shouting all the time. She likes this newer approach to clean and simple. Nothing crazy. And she likes that the G doesn’t mess with the spacing, as it so often does.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Will Skaggs
Steelfish

It’s simple enough. Not the least bit obnoxious. Will’s pick catches your eye, but doesn’t have even one letter that’s hard to work with. It’s agreeable, has a good weight and looks good kerned, too. There are no other variations, but it works as is. Everyone likes Steelfish. (Nerd alert: If this typeface looks familiar, it’s because it’s used for the end credits of The Big Bang Theory.)

 

 

 

 

 

Take our quiz to find out what typeface you should be here.

Download our case study, Fonts Deconstructed, here.

 

AcrobatAnt Marketing & Advertising
AcrobatAnt.com
1336 East 15th Street Tulsa, OK 74120
918-938-7912

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